Tag Archives: La-migra

Groups to Deliver Petition to the White House Calling on President Obama to Halt the Raids and Give Relief to Refugee Families from Central America

For Planning Purposes: Monday, February 1, 2016
Contact: Carlos Vogel, 202-239-2133, cvogel@cccaction.org

The Administration’s Unwillingness to End Raids is Unacceptable

(WASHINGTON) — Immigrant rights, social justice, and faith groups, along with directly impacted families will hold a press conference in front of the White House on Tuesday, February 2nd to deliver a petition with more than 130,000 signatures calling on President Obama to end deportation raids against refugee families from Central America and provide them with Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

Along with the petition signatures, a letter addressed to President Obama with over 75 organizational signers from across the country will also be delivered. The solidarity letter is organized by the National Korean American Service and Education Consortium (NAKASEC), Korean American Resource & Cultural Center (KRCC), Korean Resource Center (KRC), National Queer Asian Pacific Islander Alliance (NQAPIA), South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), and the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC).

The groups participating in the petition delivery include: the Fair Immigration Reform Movement (FIRM), Reform Immigration FOR America (RI4A), CREDO Action, Southeast Immigrant Rights Network (SEIRN), Church World Service (CWS), Presente.org, Center for Popular Democracy Action, Just Foreign Policy, America’s Voice, National Korean American Service & Education Consortium (NAKASEC), Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), CASA in Action, and impacted families.

Press Conference Details:

WHO:   Alma Couverthie, Senior Director of Organizing, Casa de Maryland / FIRM

             Rev. Sharon Stanley-Rea, Director of Refugee and Immigration Ministries

             for the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Quyen Dinh, Executive Director, Southeast Asia Resource Action Center   

             (SEARAC)

             Directly Impacted Families

WHAT:   Delivery of Petition to the White House Calling on President Obama to

               Halt the Raids and Give Relief to Refugee Families from Central America 

WHEN:   Tuesday, February 2, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. EST.

WHERE:   In front of the White House (Lafayette Park side)

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Standoff Continues at Wildlife Refuge in Oregon: Four Domestic Terriorists Refuse to Leave

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Published January 29, 2016

BURNS, OREGON— The takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge continued into its 28th day today as four domestic terrorists still remain.

The four remain three days after a group of fellow domestic terrorists were arrested and one shot dead.

“The negotiators continue to work around the clock to talk to those four people in an effort to get them to come out peacefully,” said FBI Special Agent in Charge Greg Bretzing.

On Thursday, the FBI released a video that dispels the notion that domestic terrorist LaVoy Fincium was attempting to surrender when he was shot dead by law enforcement.

Below is part of the FBI statement that deals with the moments leading to Finicum being shot:

When we come back to the video, the white truck leaves the scene at a high rate of speed. It travels some distance, quickly approaching a vehicle roadblock in the roadway.

As the white truck approaches the roadblock, there is a spike strip across the road but it appears Finicum missed it as he attempted to drive around the roadblock. He nearly hits an FBI agent as he maneuvers to the left. The truck gets stuck in the snowbank.

Finicum leaves the truck and steps through the snow. Agents and troopers on scene had information that Finicum and others would be armed. On at least two occasions, Finicum reaches his right hand toward a pocket on the left inside portion of his jacket. He did have a loaded 9 mm semi-automatic handgun in that pocket.

At this time, OSP troopers shot Finicum.

Approximately 30 seconds after the shooting, law enforcement officers at the scene deployed flash bangs to disorient any other armed occupants. Shortly after that, they deployed less-lethal sponge projectiles with OC capsules. Those OC capsules would be similar to pepper spray.

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Robert Iron Shell (Lakota) Named Hauff Mid-America Sports Men’s Track & Field Athlete-of-the-Week

Robert Iron Shell

Robert Iron Shell

Published January 28, 2016

SIOUX CITY, IOWA – The Great Plains Athletic Conference (GPAC) and Hauff Mid-America Sports announced Robert Iron Shell (Lakota) its men’s indoor track & field athletes-of-the-week for events held January 18-24, 2016. Hauff Mid-America Sports is the presenting sponsor of the 2015-2016 GPAC Players-of-the-Week and Players and Coaches-of-the-Year awards program.

Hauff Mid-America Sports/GPAC Men’s Indoor Track & Field Athlete-of-the-Week

Track Events – Robert Iron Shell, Briar Cliff University

Robert Iron Shell of Briar Cliff is this week’s track athlete-of-the-week.  Iron Shell, a junior from LeMars, Iowa, was a triple winner at this year’s Chelsey Henkenius Open. Robert’s times of 22.07 and 49.39 both obtained the A standard for the NAIA national meet where he is ranked 5th in both events nationally. His times are both tops in the GPAC and the 4×400 is second. His time of 22.07 is a new school record in the open 200.

Editor’s Note: This article first appeared in NDNSports.com. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

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A Passion for Helping: Pilar Montoya

Por Estaphania Baez
pilar
Born in Bogota, Colombia, Pilar Montoya left her home country when she was just 5 years old with her mother and her two older brothers, leaving behind her dad, the rest of her family and friends, and the thousands of memories forged during her early childhood. Her mother’s goal was clear: to provide a better future for her children, and what better place to pursue that than the country of the Stars and Stripes, so she brought them to Los Angeles, California. It was there that Pilar witnessed a woman’s first act of grit and bravery and decided to follow on that same path. Today, she dedicates her life to helping the millions of Latinos in the U.S. shine through a foundation she set up precisely to help Hispanics living abroad, in addition to her being a motivational speaker and businesswoman.

After becoming a U.S. citizen at 11, she has never stopped thriving. She got her degree at Sacramento State University, and has over 25 years of experience in business entrepreneurship. She has also earned national and international awards and is known in the business world as a born leader and outstanding public speaker.

“My passion is helping those in the community who feel like they’re alone and make them see that they are not. I came to the realization that our challenge as Latinos is to get a job, build trust, create a good life in the U.S. both for ourselves and for our children, and achieve our dreams… that is the reason why I help the community”, highlighted Pilar Montoya during her interview La Prensa San Diego.

Pilar Montoya, now a resident of San Diego, created the Caminos Foundation in 2014, and since then she has provided support to more than 2,000 low-income Hispanic residents. The foundation provides training to men and women looking for work, as well as workshops to educate the community regarding risks they are susceptible to, such as diabetes, obesity, and cancer, which greatly impact the Hispanic community due to not having the right information as to how to protect their health. Also through her foundation, Ms. Montoya works with small-business entrepreneurs seeking to open their own business; she advises them on how to obtain their licenses, better manage their finances, and sometimes even provides the resources needed to get their businesses going. As a result, Pilar is greatly admired and loved by the people who have found in her a helping hand.

Pilar shared that one of her greatest recent achievements has been the workshops she provides specifically for Latino women, where she teaches them to overcome all the challenges life can throw at you and turn them into positive results.
“You can either play the victim or you can learn how to get back up and overcome the challenge; the key – and my goal – is to inspire, to encourage these people to get over the hump… people who have lost their job… that is how life is, we all go through it, and these obstacles have to be risen over”, stressed Ms. Montoya.

These workshops for women are taught through MANA, a grassroots organization, over a four-month period.
In spite of the large number of awards Pilar has earned and the satisfaction she feels when she sees her alumni thrive, she assured us that nothing can compare with the great pride she feels seeing her children – Carlos, now 28, and Sibone, who is 25 – becoming successful professionals. Carlos is an industrial designer, and her little girl has a degree in Psychology; they have both lived in the U.S. their entire lives and have had access to better opportunities, all thanks to their mother’s work.

Pilar Montoya is part of a growing list of successful Latino women who have made it in a country other than their own. She is a source of pride for the Hispanic community, a Latino jewel.

Of All Arizona and New Mexico Tribes, Navajo had More Violent Crimes in 2014

In this Feb. 12, 2014 file photo, Navajo police officers closely keep watch on two men who lie handcuffed on the ground early Wednesday morning after executing a search warrant in Shiprock. Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero

In this Feb. 12, 2014 file photo, Navajo police officers closely keep watch on two men who lie handcuffed on the ground early Wednesday morning after executing a search warrant in Shiprock. Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero The Navajo Nation Drug & Gang Unit along with the Strategic Reaction Team aim their weapons at the front door of a suspected meth dealer on an early Feb. 12, 2014 in Shiprock while executing a search warrant. Officers arrested two men without incident. During their search, officers found 2.2 grams of meth and stolen firearms.

Navajo Times | Donovan Quintero
The Navajo Nation Drug & Gang Unit along with the Strategic Reaction Team aim their weapons at the front door of a suspected meth dealer on an early Feb. 12, 2014 in Shiprock while executing a search warrant. Officers arrested two men without incident. During their search, officers found 2.2 grams of meth and stolen firearms.

Published January 21, 2016

WINDOW ROCK, ARIZONA — New Mexico continues to face a higher degree of violent crimes than most other states, according to figures released recently by the FBI.

National figures put out by the FBI for 2014, the latest year that is available, places New Mexico as the fourth highest state when it comes to the amount of violent crime per capita.

And figures provided for crime in Indian Country shows violent and property crime per capita far higher on the Navajo Reservation than for any other tribes in the country.

These figures coincide with figures released annually by the Navajo Nation Division of Public Safety.

New Mexico in 2014, according to FBI figures, showed 8,653 cases of violent crimes in metropolitan areas, 2,908 in the smaller cities in the state and 895 in rural areas in the state.

Violent crimes include murders, rapes, and aggravated assaults (usually with a weapon of some kind).

Looking at the counties in the state, San Juan ranked third (behind Bernalillo and Valencia) and McKinley County rates third in the state behind Otero and Taos for crime in non-metropolitan areas.

McKinley County Undersheriff Paul Lucero said Wednesday that crime in the county is high “but it seems to be getting a little better.”

Editor’s Note: This article was first published in the Navajo Times. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

 

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Cherokee Nation to Disperse Heirloom Seeds February 1st

Two-week-old Native Tobacco/Cherokee Ceremonial Tobacco seedlings grown by Cherokee Nation citizen Eugene Wilmeth using Cherokee Nation Seed Bank inventory.

Two-week-old Native Tobacco/Cherokee Ceremonial Tobacco seedlings grown by Cherokee Nation citizen Eugene Wilmeth using Cherokee Nation Seed Bank inventory.

Published January 20, 2016

TAHLEQUAH, OKLAHOMA — The Cherokee Nation will begin dispersing its limited supply of heirloom seeds to tribal citizens interested in growing traditional Cherokee crops and plants starting February 1, 2016.

The Cherokee Nation keeps an inventory of seeds from rare breeds of corn, beans, squash, gourds, Trail of Tears beads, tobacco and several plants traditionally used for Cherokee customs. The seeds are not available in stores.

“The seed bank continues to expand and get more popular every year with our citizens. It’s also an important way the Cherokee Nation can keep our link to the land strong and preserve our history and heritage,” said Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “For Cherokee people, the process of harvesting seeds and passing them down has gone on for generations. It is an essential part of who we are today, and because of the seed bank program, we have created a growing interest with a new generation of Cherokees.”

In 2015, the tribe distributed 3,463 packages of seeds to Cherokee Nation citizens.

Eugene Wilmeth, a Cherokee Nation citizen of Midwest City, Oklahoma, planted Cherokee White Eagle Corn and Native tobacco seeds.

“I am very grateful for the Cherokee Nation seed bank, which gives me the opportunity to grow traditional and sacred plants that connect us to our culture and to our Creator. The program allows each of us to play an important role in the preservation of our heritage,” Wilmeth said.

Citizens are limited to two varieties. To get the seeds, citizens can either make an appointment to pick them up or email their request to seedbank@cherokee.org to have them sent by mail. Individuals must include a copy of his or her Cherokee Nation tribal citizenship card, proof of age and address.

For more information, contact Pat Gwin at 918-453-5704.

 

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Navajo Nation Confirms First Hantavirus Death of 2016

deer mousePublished January 20, 2016

NAVAJO NATION —The Navajo Nation has confirmed the first Hantavirus death of 2016.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome is transmitted to people that come into contact with or breathe infected urine, droppings and/or saliva of wild mice, primarily deer mice. Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry Hantavirus is at risk of HPS. The illness is not spread from person to person.

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome was first identified in 1993 when an outbreak of this infectious lung disease took place in the southwestern United States on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

The illness starts with fever, headache and muscle aches, and progresses rapidly to severe difficulty in breathing and, in some cases, death.

People should make sure to rodent-proof their homes to prevent infected mice from coming inside.

When cleaning rodent droppings, people should use a mask, disinfectant and gloves.

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Flags to Fly at Half-Staff on Navajo Nation to Honor Code Talker Ernest Yazhe

A screenshot of a video featuring Ernest Yazhe in 2013 produced by the Utah National Guard. Courtesy of Utah National Guard/YouTube

Courtesy of Utah National Guard/YouTube

Published January 16, 2016

WINDOW ROCK– The Navajo Nation Office of President and Vice President announced flags will fly at half-staff on the Navajo Nation from January 19 – 22, 2016 to honor Navajo Code Talker Ernest Yazhe, who walked on Tuesday. Code Talker Yazhe was 92.

Yazhe was stationed and trained as a Code Talker in New Caledonia and fought as a Navajo Code Talker in both Guam and Okinawa during World War II. Yazhe served in the U.S. Marine Corps with courage, honor and distinction from 1942 to February 1946 when he was honorably discharged.

“It is always a great loss when one of our iconic Navajo Code Talkers leaves us. Mr. Yazhe was honored and revered not only by our Navajo people but also honored and recognized on a national level,” said Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye.

“Our world, as it exists today, would not be the same had it not been for our Code Talkers and for this we will forever be grateful,” added President Begaye.

“Our beloved Navajo Code Talkers are among the greatest generation of American citizens that put their lives on the line during World War II in defense of freedom and democracy,” Navajo Nation Vice President Jonathan Nez said. “The Navajo language was the secret weapon that brought victory to the Allied Forces and ended the war in the Pacific.”

Vice President Nez added the Navajo Nation is mourning the loss of not only a true American hero, but a role model and positive example for the Navajo people.

President Begaye and Vice President Nez signed and issued a proclamation for all flags to be flown at half-staff in honor and memory of Code Talker Yazhe, which will be presented to the family during the interment service of Mr. Yazhe.

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Leonard Peltier’s MRI Confirms Abdominal Aortic Aneurism Diagnosis

Breaking News

Published January 10, 2016

Leonard Peltier

Leonard Peltier has been in prison for 40 years

COLEMAN, FLORIDA — The International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee (ILPDC) in an email to Native News Online on Sunday evening said that the preliminary diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurism has been confirmed. MRI results indicating the size and location must be reviewed by physicians who will consult with Peltier.

“We would expect the Bureau of Prison to act with utmost urgency, but have long ago learned not to get our hopes up for speedy action,” says Peter Clark, co-chairman of the International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee. “The last time I visited Leonard was June 2015. During our visit Leonard put his hand on his abdomen and said ‘I know something is wrong in here.’ He then went on to describe symptoms of this condition. Leonard had described his illness to the medical staff at Coleman USP I prior to June 2015.”

“ILPDC has put out numerous calls to action since that time, and Leonard’s legal team and supporters have fought for years for adequate healthcare for Leonard. ILPDC will provide further details as they become available. Supporters should keep pressure on the Bureau of Prison for timely treatment and transfer to a suitable medical facility,” Clark continued.

Please visit http://1.usa.gov/1OYcCnt. Make reference to Leonard Peltier #89637-132 and USP Coleman I. Voice your concern about Leonard’s medical treatment, and let the federal Bureau of Prisons know that the world is watching. Demand that Leonard receive the best possible care.

Please also contact:

Federal Bureau of Prisons
320 First St., NW
Washington, DC 20534
202-307-3198
info@bop.gov

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