Category Archives: innovation

Harvard, MIT Sue ICE, Homeland Security Over Rules Barring International Students – NBC Boston

The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Boston, asks for a temporary restraining order to keep Homeland Security and ICE from enforcing the federal guidelines which state that removal proceedings could be initiated for international students who refuse to transfer to a school offering in-person classes.

Source: Harvard, MIT Sue ICE, Homeland Security Over Rules Barring International Students – NBC Boston

Opinion | When Art Is Medicine – The New York Times

Ojibwe stories say the Jingle Dress Dance arose when a young girl grew ill and appeared to be near death. Her father dreamed of a new dress and dance that were imbued with an unusual power to heal. The healing dresses were quickly made and embellished with tinkling metal cones, then given to four women at a ceremonial dance. Hearing the sounds, the girl began to feel stronger. By the end of the night she was dancing, too. This young pandemic survivor helped organize the first Jingle Dress Dance Society. Versions of this story are told from central Minnesota to northern Ontario.

Opinion | An Open Letter to President Trump – The New York Times

The nation craves a plan, not hunches.

Step 1: First, you need to call for a 50-state sheltering-in-place/social-distancing program. While the experts differ on how long that national lockdown should be — two weeks, four weeks, eight weeks, whatever the C.D.C. recommends, I say — they virtually all agree that it is needed to manifestly slow the spread of the coronavirus, to prevent our hospitals from being overwhelmed and to buy us the critical time we need to collect the data required to inform all future decision-making.

Step 2: We use this period of lockdown to gather as much data as possible about who has the coronavirus, where they live, what their ages and degrees of illness are, what the mortality rate is at what ages, and what other ailments or immune deficiencies they may have.

Step 3: This data can then be the foundation of what Katz calls “the pivot.” Once we have slowed the transmission of the coronavirus nationally — and developed a stratified national risk map — we can then, on the basis of that data, said Katz, begin phasing people back into the workplace to get the economy humming again.

Greta Thunberg’s Stirring UN Speech Is Not ‘Cute’ or ‘Badass’

Thunberg is not here to be palatable. She is not here to be adorable GIF-fodder, or to reassure apathetic elites that the future is in good hands. She is here to be taken seriously. The stakes are too high for her not to be. Her activism isn’t cute—it’s terrifying.

Source: Greta Thunberg’s Stirring UN Speech Is Not ‘Cute’ or ‘Badass’

Hear the First Recording of the Human Voice (1860) | Open Culture

When inventor Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville sang a nursery rhyme into his phonoautogram in 1860, he had no plans on ever playing this recording back. A precursor to the wax cylinder, the phonoautogram took inputs for the study of sound waves, but could not be turned into an output device.

Source: Hear the First Recording of the Human Voice (1860) | Open Culture

Largest collection of breached data ever seen is found | Technology | The Guardian – Time to just give up or… fund an international policing agency to track and disrupt the hackers and hack traders?

Store of 770m email addresses and passwords discovered after being posted to a hacking forum

Source: Largest collection of breached data ever seen is found | Technology | The Guardian

Time for a Real Conversation Around Border Security : Immigration Impact

In years past, most arrivals were Mexican migrants who came into the United States for seasonal work. However, as Mexico’s economy improved, migration patterns began to change and fewer Mexicans  chose to come to the United States. This change from economic migrants to refugees and asylum-seekers requires a new response. Many arriving today are children and families fleeing extreme levels of violence and political corruption in their native countries and risk persecution and death if they are forced to return. Our laws make clear that anyone arriving at the border has the right to apply for asylum. Yet, asylum seekers are being turned away as if they were not fleeing for their lives. Worse, many are met with tear gas and are illegally refused access to the asylum process. We owe it to ourselves to have a discussion around what these changes mean for border security, how we should respond to instability in Central America, and how we keep America safe and prosperous. The discussion on the border wall relies on an over-simplistic and expensive solution to economic migration and a cruel response to asylum-seeking migration. Instead of focusing on erecting a largely symbolic struct

Source: Time for a Real Conversation Around Border Security : Immigration Impact