Category Archives: healthcare

Opinion | Why We Are Leaving the G.O.P. – The New York Times

We don’t have the space to outline President Trump’s transgressions, but it is important to understand that his rise is an inevitable result of the hostility to women within the Republican culture. Women’s reproductive freedom has shifted with the wind: Remember that Ronald Reagan once supported abortion rights, as did George H. W. Bush, Mitt Romney and Mr. Trump himself. We can no longer support a Republican Party that is shutting down low-cost health care clinics offering cancer screenings, basic health services and much-needed family planning services. It has become a party that wants to punish pregnant women by limiting their economic choices, that wants to reduce access to sex education programs that prevent unintended pregnancy and disease. It is no wonder that women are voting with their feet.

Chicken safety fear as chlorine washing fails bacteria tests | World news | The Guardian Major Oops!

The chlorine washing of food, the controversial “cleaning” technique used by many US poultry producers who want access to the British market post-Brexit, does not remove contaminants, a new study has found. The investigation, by a team of microbiologists from Southampton University and published in the US journal mBio, found that bacilli such as listeria and salmonella remain completely active after chlorine washing. The process merely makes it impossible to culture them in the lab, giving the false impression that the chlorine washing has been effective. Apart from a few voluntary codes, the American poultry industry is unregulated compared with that in the EU, allowing for flocks to be kept in far greater densities and leading to a much higher incidence of infection. While chicken farmers in the EU manage contamination through higher welfare standards, smaller flock densities and inoculation, chlorine washing is routinely used in the US right at the end of the process, after slaughter, to clean carcasses. This latest study indicates it simply doesn’t work.

Source: Chicken safety fear as chlorine washing fails bacteria tests | World news | The Guardian

Study suggests oral antibiotics may increase kidney stone risk | CIDRAP

Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of kidney stone disease has risen by 70%, with the greatest increases seen in children and young women. Although dietary and lifestyle factors have been suggested as possible causes for this increase, the exact reasons remain unclear. In a study today in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, researchers with Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia suggest another possibility: oral antibiotic use.

Source: Study suggests oral antibiotics may increase kidney stone risk | CIDRAP

Management and control of communicable diseases in schools and other child care settings: systematic review on the incubation period and period of infectiousness | BMC Infectious Diseases | Full Text

Source: Management and control of communicable diseases in schools and other child care settings: systematic review on the incubation period and period of infectiousness | BMC Infectious Diseases | Full Text

HTLV-1 primers: a list of some that have been published in the scientific literature

In recent weeks there has been a surge in media interest about a virus called human T-lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-1) that is present among the Indigenous Australians living in communities around the…

Source: HTLV-1 primers: a list of some that have been published in the scientific literature

“Oops!” Price to pay: Antibiotic-resistant infections cost $2 billion a year | CIDRAP

Source: Price to pay: Antibiotic-resistant infections cost $2 billion a year | CIDRAP

Antibiotic resistance adds nearly $1,400 to the bill for treating a bacterial infection and costs the nation more than $2 billion annually, according to a study yesterday in Health Affairs.

The study, which is the first national estimate of the incremental costs for treating antibiotic-resistant infections, also found that the share of bacterial infections in the United States that were antibiotic resistant more than doubled over 13 years, rising from 5.2% in 2002 to 11% in 2014.