Category Archives: healthcare

DRC Ebola total hits 699 amid more resistance, insecurity | CIDRAP

The number of confirmed cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Ebola outbreak has jumped by 19 since Friday, most of them in Katwa, where responders face more community resistance. Over the course of the outbreak, responders have been grappling with evolving challenges in different areas. In today’s update, the health ministry described a security incident at a health checkpoint in Komanda that injured two workers.

Source: DRC Ebola total hits 699 amid more resistance, insecurity | CIDRAP

Opinion | How to Inoculate Against Anti-Vaxxers – The New York Times

It’s no mystery how we got here. On the internet, anti-vaccine propaganda has outpaced pro-vaccine public health information. The anti-vaxxers, as they are colloquially known, have hundreds of websites promoting their message, a roster of tech- and media-savvy influencers and an aggressive political arm that includes at least a dozen political action committees. Defense against this onslaught has been meager. The C.D.C., the nation’s leading public health agency, has a website with accurate information, but no loud public voice. The United States Surgeon General’s office has been mum. So has the White House — and not just under the current administration. That leaves just a handful of academics who get bombarded with vitriol, including outright threats, every time they try to counter pseudoscience with fact. The consequences of this disparity are substantial: a surge in outbreaks of measles, mumps, pertussis and other diseases; an increase in influenza deaths; and dismal rates of HPV vaccination, which doctors say could effectively wipe out cervical cancer if it were better utilized. But infectious disease experts warn that things could get much worse. Trust in vaccines is being s

Megadrought and Megadeath in 16th Century Mexico – Volume 8, Number 4—April 2002 – Emerging Infectious Diseases journal – CDC – 25 million deaths in Mexico 1519-1576

The native people of Mexico experienced an epidemic disease in the wake of European conquest (Figure 1), beginning with the smallpox epidemic of 1519 to 1520 when 5 million to 8 million people perished. The catastrophic epidemics that began in 1545 and 1576 subsequently killed an additional 7 million to 17 million people in the highlands of Mexico (1–3). Recent epidemiologic research suggests that the events in 1545 and 1576, associated with a high death rate and referred to as cocoliztli (Nahuatl for “pest”), may have been due to indigenous hemorrhagic fevers (4,5). Tree-ring evidence, allowing reconstructions of the levels precipitation, indicate that the worst drought to afflict North America in the past 500 years also occurred in the mid-16th century, when severe drought extended at times from Mexico to the boreal forest and from the Pacific to Atlantic coasts (6). These droughts appear to have interacted with ecologic and sociologic conditions, magnifying the human impact of infectious disease in 16th-century Mexico. The epidemic of cocoliztli from1545 to 1548 killed an estimated 5 million to 15 million people, or up to 80% of the native population of Mexico (Figure 1). In ab

Source: Megadrought and Megadeath in 16th Century Mexico – Volume 8, Number 4—April 2002 – Emerging Infectious Diseases journal – CDC

Zuckerberg San Francisco General’s aggressive tactics leave patients with big bills – Vox – Plain and simple – the hospital is gouging those it can get away with gouging – driving them to low-income status.

I spent a year writing about ER bills. Zuckerberg San Francisco General has the most surprising billing practices I’ve seen.

Source: Zuckerberg San Francisco General’s aggressive tactics leave patients with big bills – Vox

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Talks to Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes

“I know that when the sun sets on my life, I want to be able to tell my grandchildren that we established a single-payer system, tuition for universities, and that we saved the climate for their future, because we decided to be courageous in the moment and make it happen,” she said.

Source: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Talks to Anderson Cooper on 60 Minutes

Opinion | What a French Doctor’s Office Taught Me About Health Care – The New York Times

In France I can rest assured I will not be refused care for any treatable condition, including a painful bunion — or yes, even a recurrence of breast cancer. All the same, I’d rather have been able to get coverage without emigrating. Too many Americans do not realize how much better off they would be if they felt safer about access to medical care. Imagine what might happen if everyone felt safe — safe enough to talk about ailments in waiting rooms.