All posts by nedhamson

Activist, writer, researcher, addicted to sharing information and facts.

Saudis to Send 2 Women to London Games – NYTimes.com

Saudis to Send 2 Women to London Games – NYTimes.com. Better than none but hope for more flexibility in future…

“A big inspiration for participating in the Olympic Games is being one of the first women for Saudi Arabia to be going,” the 17-year-old Attar said in an IOC statement from her U.S. training base in San Diego. “It’s such a huge honor and I hope that it can really make some big strides for women over there to get more involved in sport.”

Young Ticos take a ride on the Bibliobús / Arts & Leisure / Weekend / Costa Rica Newspaper, The Tico Times

Young Ticos take a ride on the Bibliobús / Arts & Leisure / Weekend / Costa Rica Newspaper, The Tico TimesIn 2011, the bibliobús visited 14,000 children. Rodríguez said favorite stories include “Mommy, Tell Me a Story” and “Animals of the Farm.” “Today we read to them, tomorrow they read to themselves and soon they will be reading to others,” Rodríguez said.

Sofia Mora, 11, said her favorite story is “Romeo and Juliet.” She read it last time the bus visited, this time she couldn’t find it. She said the story of the “Three Little Pigs” was OK, but “it’s for little kids.” All age groups using the bus get the same story. Mora hopes that on the next visit from the bibliobús, there will be a copy of “Romeo and Juliet” waiting for her.

THE DAILY STAR :: News :: Middle East :: Palestinian women battle to break into business

THE DAILY STAR :: News :: Middle East :: Palestinian women battle to break into business.

Huda al-Jack, owner and managing partner of the West Bank’s first coffee chain, Zman cafe, blames a culture where men do deals with each other in a social context that tends to exclude women.

“It was difficult for me to integrate,” said al-Jack, who is of Sudanese-Palestinian descent and who moved to Ramallah from California in 2003.

“I had to really prove myself. I started out making 30 percent of what I was making in the States.” Only after working her way up the ladder, and helping launch a company in Dubai, did al-Jack get taken seriously, she said.

“Sometimes I feel like we’re going backwards,” she said, adding that society’s refusal to address sexual harassment in the workplace continues to limit women.

Al-Jack hopes to develop a gender-blind business community and is currently planning another establishment where a Palestinian woman will serve customers.

Emerging female business leaders are following in the wake of al-Jack’s success. Ziadeh, her dance studio only recently opened, sees the role of businesswomen as essential if a future, independent Palestinian state is to be a success.

“People will accept that women can handle it, that women are changing,” she said. “I want the world to know that we Palestinians can do it. We can grow.”

Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2012/Jul-11/180217-palestinian-women-battle-to-break-into-business.ashx#ixzz20LENFeOZ
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb

Tell Congress to Support CNCS and vital national service programs – Habitat for Humanity Advocacy

Tell Congress to Support CNCS and vital national service programs – Habitat for Humanity Advocacy.

Every day Habitat for Humanity affiliates across the country rely on the important work of national service members through programs like AmeriCorps and AmeriCorps VISTA. These members help manage, organize and lead thousands of Habitat volunteers, or support the daily operations of affiliates. Some in Congress have threatened to cut funding for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) — the federal agency that oversees national service programs. This cut would greatly reduce the capacity of Habitat affiliates to serve partner families. Make your voice heard today by telling your members of Congress that funding for CNCS helps Habitat fulfill its mission.

Afghan Womens Writing Project | My Father, My Hero

You faced many difficulties because of me, worked through the cold and hot weather with tears in your eyes and calluses on your hands.

You took my hand and walked with meshowed me how to smile, and to defend against disaster.

You supported me when the world abused me.

You didn’t leave me alone.Oh my Father, my heroI will go forward and fight for my rights.

I will be a listener for others.You showed how to find the light even in a dark room.

How to walk in the desert under the scorching sun.

You made me hopeful when I was lost

You showed me how to live in this dark world.

By Hila G.

via Afghan Womens Writing Project | My Father, My Hero.

Historian urges black gardeners to dig into their roots | Online Athens

By sowing heirloom African seeds into rows at the West Broad Market Garden, farmers from the predominantly black community who grow the crops can own the story behind their toil, said a culinary historian who recently visited the urban farm.

Michael Twitty, a Washington, D.C.-based historian studying the culinary traditions of American slaves, toured the former elementary school playground at the corner of West Broad and Paris streets Tuesday with Community Network Garden Manager Fenwick Broyard.

via Historian urges black gardeners to dig into their roots | Online Athens.

Recommendation R193 – Promotion of Cooperatives Recommendation, 2002 (No. 193)

1. It is recognized that cooperatives operate in all sectors of the economy. This Recommendation applies to all types and forms of cooperatives.

2. For the purposes of this Recommendation, the term “cooperative” means an autonomous association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprise.

3. The promotion and strengthening of the identity of cooperatives should be encouraged on the basis of:

(a) cooperative values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity and solidarity; as well as ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility and caring for others; and

(b) cooperative principles as developed by the international cooperative movement and as referred to in the Annex hereto. These principles are: voluntary and open membership; democratic member control; member economic participation; autonomy and independence; education, training and information; cooperation among cooperatives; and concern for community.

4. Measures should be adopted to promote the potential of cooperatives in all countries, irrespective of their level of development, in order to assist them and their membership to:

(a) create and develop income-generating activities and sustainable decent employment;

(b) develop human resource capacities and knowledge of the values, advantages and benefits of the cooperative movement through education and training;

(c) develop their business potential, including entrepreneurial and managerial capacities;

(d) strengthen their competitiveness as well as gain access to markets and to institutional finance;

(e) increase savings and investment;

(f) improve social and economic well-being, taking into account the need to eliminate all forms of discrimination;

(g) contribute to sustainable human development; and

(h) establish and expand a viable and dynamic distinctive sector of the economy, which includes cooperatives, that responds to the social and economic needs of the community.

5. The adoption of special measures should be encouraged to enable cooperatives, as enterprises and organizations inspired by solidarity, to respond to their members’ needs and the needs of society, including those of disadvantaged groups in order to achieve their social inclusion.

via Recommendation R193 – Promotion of Cooperatives Recommendation, 2002 (No. 193).

Afghan Women’s Writing Project | Who Is She?

I told her, “you are a light.”

She responded, “even brighter”

I asked,  “are you the moon?”

She said, “even higher”

I inquired, “the sun?”

She said, “much warmer”

I said, “then you are you an angel”

She countered, “prettier”

I asked, “are you paradise?”

She answered, “the only way to reach one”

Then I said, “Oh divine light, who are you?”

She replied, “your Mother”

By Mariam

via Afghan Women’s Writing Project | Who Is She?.

Afghan Women’s Writing Project | My Father, My Hero

Afghan Women’s Writing Project | My Father, My Hero.

You faced many difficulties because of me, worked through the cold and hot weather
with tears in your eyes and calluses on your hands.

You took my hand and walked with me
showed me how to smile, and to defend against disaster.
You supported me when the world abused me.
You didn’t leave me alone.

Oh my Father, my hero
I will go forward and fight for my rights. I will be a listener for others.
You showed how to find the light even in a dark room.
How to walk in the desert under the scorching sun.

You made me hopeful when I was lost
You showed me how to live in this dark world.

By Hila G.

Afghan Women’s Writing Project | Yes, We Are Afghan Children

We are butterflies concealing our beauty

We are pale flowers locked in our fragrance

We are stars in the sky without the light of the moon

We are clouds darkly holding heaven’s waters

Yes, we are Afghan children

We are deprived of the pleasures of childhood

—the toys, the laughter, the freedom

We are orphaned children longing for family

Some living without mothers, some without fathers

We are orphaned children desiring kisses from parents who have disappeared

Explosions are the music of our lives

We are orphaned children existing inside cold, cramped tents

We are orphaned children working to feed our families

Working with tiny, cold hands

Hands aching during the night

Hands begging to be warm

During every second we breathe, loud voices escape

Shrieking

We want life, happiness

—food, toys, books, school, peace

Yes, we still have hopes

It is never impossible

We will be shiny butterflies

We will be soft flowers spreading our sweet smell

We will be the light in the sky even during the night

By Farahnaz

via Afghan Women’s Writing Project | Yes, We Are Afghan Children.