She treated Myanmar’s resistance and paid with her life – BBC News

Zarli Naing

A month after the coup, she left Nay Pyi Taw and returned to her home village. But fearing her political activism would endanger her family, she decided to move on to a safe zone in the north of Magway, which is largely controlled by opposition forces.

There she became part of an extensive underground healthcare network run by the thousands of doctors and nurses who have left their jobs in protest against the coup.

She was also trying to complete an online degree course from the prestigious University of Nursing in Mandalay. She had started the programme in early 2020, but it was disrupted by the pandemic.

“When I spoke to her a month ago she told me how happy she was to be there,” says one of her online supervisors, a nursing instructor for the clandestine network.

“She was especially happy that she could give first aid training to the PDF fighters in her area, because there are no other healthcare staff there. She was the only one able to give that service to them.”

 

Source: She treated Myanmar’s resistance and paid with her life – BBC News