Somber artwork unveiled at LAC + USC Medical Center, an apology for coerced sterilization in 1968-1974 – San Gabriel Valley Tribune

Meaning “to survive and to keep alive,” Huynh described her work, Sobrevivir, as a permanent apology and somber reminder of the coerced sterilizations performed on 240 mostly low-income, Mexican-American immigrant women. They delivered babies between 1968 and 1974 at the county hospital facility and then underwent postpartum sterilization, usually in the form of tubal ligation. Investigations by the county raised serious questions as to whether the women understood what was being asked of them due to language and cultural barriers, and which concluded that the women’s consent may not have been informed. First District Supervisor Hilda Solis, who spearheaded the project, said the story hit her hard, and years later is still relevant. “Many of the 240 women did not even realize until later they had lost their reproductive rights. This was an assault on their freedom, something we are seeing once again with the Supreme Court’s ruling to end the constitutional right to an abortion,” Solis said. Women, community members, doctors, nurses, county officials and the press stood on the artwork’s edge taking pictures and videos of the large work and adjoining plaque. The moment “was a long

Source: Somber artwork unveiled at LAC + USC Medical Center, an apology for coerced sterilization in 1968-1974 – San Gabriel Valley Tribune