Tucker Carlson On Russian TV Again for Guest Comments Against Ukraine

Fox News host Tucker Carlson was featured on Russian state TV once again after Kremlin speakers told Ukraine to listen to Fox’s pro-Russia talking points and surrender to Russian President Vladimir
— Read on www.newsweek.com/carlson-makes-russian-state-tv-again-guest-comments-against-ukraine-1684345

Straight up traitor!

Hundreds of COVID trials could provide a deluge of new drugs

It takes Lawrence Tabak about 15 minutes to rattle off all the potential COVID-19 treatments being tested in the clinical trial programme he oversees: a lengthy, tongue-twisting list that includes drugs to disarm the virus, to soothe inflammation and to stop blood clots. Over the past two years, the ACTIV programme, run by the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), has included more than 30 studies — 13 of them ongoing — of therapeutic agents chosen from a list of 800 candidates. Several of the studies are due to report results in the first half of the year.

And that’s just in his programme; hundreds more are in progress around the world. Whether those results are positive or negative, Tabak says, 2022 is poised to provide some much-needed clarity on how best to treat COVID-19. “The next three to four months are, we hope, going to be very exciting,” says Tabak, acting director of the NIH in Bethesda, Maryland. “Even when a trial does not show efficacy, that’s still incredibly important information. It tells you what not to use.”

Source: Hundreds of COVID trials could provide a deluge of new drugs

Leader of Alabama Chapter of Oath Keepers Pleads Guilty to Seditious Conspiracy and Obstruction of Congress for Efforts to Stop Transfer of Power Following 2020 Presidential Election | OPA | Department of Justice

In his guilty plea, James, a military veteran, admitted that, from November 2020 through January 2021, he conspired with other Oath Keeper members and affiliates to use force to prevent, hinder and delay the execution of the laws of the United States governing the transfer of presidential power. He used encrypted and private communications, equipped himself with a variety of weapons, donned combat and tactical gear, and was prepared to answer a call to take up arms.

According to court documents, on Jan. 4, 2021, James and others traveled to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. He brought a semi-automatic handgun and stored multiple firearms at a Virginia hotel. On Jan. 6, after learning the Capitol had been breached, James and others traveled to the Capitol on golf carts, driving around multiple barricades, including marked law enforcement vehicles. James was wearing a backpack, a combat shirt, tactical gloves, boots, a paracord attachment, and an Oath Keepers hat and patches. He and others unlawfully entered the Capitol together through the East Rotunda doors. Inside the Rotunda, James assaulted a Metropolitan Police Department officer by grabbing the officer’s vest and pulling him towards the mob. While pulling the officer, James yelled, “Get out of my Capitol! This is not yours! This is my Capitol!” James was expelled by law enforcement, including at least one officer who aimed chemical spray at him.

Source: Leader of Alabama Chapter of Oath Keepers Pleads Guilty to Seditious Conspiracy and Obstruction of Congress for Efforts to Stop Transfer of Power Following 2020 Presidential Election | OPA | Department of Justice

Opinion | Putin No Longer Seems Like a Master of Disinformation – The New York Times

In the Ukraine invasion, though, we are seeing that Russian influence has significant limits — and perhaps the unraveling of the myth of Putin’s mastery over global discourse. Whatever the military and geopolitical outcome in Ukraine, it’s already clear that Russia has suffered a public-relations catastrophe. Repudiation of the invasion has been swift, forceful and widespread — spanning adversaries and even a few Russian allies and acolytes, and crossing from the world of foreign affairs into culture, sports and business. Even Putin admirers like Tucker Carlson and Trump himself have been forced to walk back early praise for Putin’s designs on Ukraine. “They’re just reading the room,” said Todd Helmus, a behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation who analyzes Russian propaganda. “Anyone who’s been watching this can see that Russia has been struggling to build any kind of narrative to support what it’s doing.” There are many theories for why Russian propaganda about Ukraine has fallen so flat. Perhaps the most obvious is that the invasion is just too ugly a pig to pretty up — an act so baldly unjustified that no amount of propaganda could set it right…

Solidarity in Wartime: Interview with a Ukrainian Union Leader | Labor Notes

Ignacy Jóźwiak of the Polish union Workers’ Initiative interviewed Witalij Machinko, leader of the Workers’ Solidarity Trade Union in Kyiv, Ukraine, on February 27. This interview comes to us via the International Trade Union Network of Solidarity and Struggle. It has been translated through Polish and French, and we apologize for any errors in the process.

Source: Solidarity in Wartime: Interview with a Ukrainian Union Leader | Labor Notes

Cada letra, cada palabra, cada texto

Santiago Galicia Rojon Serrallonga

SANTIAGO GALICIA ROJON SERRALLONGA

Derechos reservados conforme a la ley/ Copyright

Cada letra es un pétalo, una flor, una hoja, un pedazo de árbol, un fragmento de tantas palabras que se escriben y a veces se pronuncian y en ocasiones se callan, igual que el viento que, al soplar, envuelve su aliento en murmullos o lo encapsula en silencios. Cada palabra forma parte de la narración o del poema, del cuento que arrulla a los niños o de las novelas que emocionan a los lectores, de los versos que enamoran y dan paz y armonía. Cada texto, en el arte, es un deleite, un regalo que se entrega, una noche o a cualquier hora, a alguien muy amado y especial, a los lectores, a la gente que se deleita al recibirlo. Cada letra abraza a la que uno traza al lado y, juntas, fabrican cuentos, novelas, relatos, poemas, como las…

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