How you can get free N95 masks from the US government – Vox

The CDC says you shouldn’t wear them more than five times. However, Anne Miller of Project N95, a nonprofit that assists communities with acquiring personal protective equipment, COVID-19 diagnostic tests, and other crucial supplies, told NPR that you can think about the five wearings in terms of eight-hour days, or 40 hours of wear total — meaning if you go for a 20-minute trip to the store, you can count that as 20 minutes off of that mask’s 40-hour life. One way the CDC and other experts recommend extending the use of your masks is what Miller calls the “brown bag decontamination method.” You can store an N95 in a breathable paper bag for a week, and then reuse it, as the viral particles on it will have died off by then.

Source: How you can get free N95 masks from the US government – Vox

Day 53/67: Five Month GED, The Water Cycle, and Adulting

Inspiring Critical Thinking and Community via Books, Lessons, and Story

So, as citizens of a republic, why do you think that the water cycle may be related to Adulting?

 Middle of week 14/18
Day 53, Week 14
Grammar: Prepositional Phrases review
Math: Combining like terms review
Science and history: Who were the Anasazi, and what was their relationship with water?
Please see the Lesson plan for Day 53’s Exit Tickets
(Day 52 … Day 54)

Action Prompts:  

1.) Search for two different sources to learn how your local water supply is treated,

2.) Please tell us where your information comes from, and how you know that the sources you found are reliable,

3.) Write a book, story, blog post or tweet that uses your findings, and then, please tell us about it! If you write a book, once it is published please consider donating a copy to your local public library.

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Click here…

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Cuando despertemos

Santiago Galicia Rojon Serrallonga

SANTIAGO GALICIA ROJON SERRALLONGA

Derechosreservados conforme a la ley/ Copyright

¿Y si los niños de la hora presente, olvidan jugar, reír y soñar? ¿Y si, al despertar, encuentran un mundo despedazado? ¿Y si, además, pierden el concepto y la imagen de la familia? ¿Y si alguien, y otros más, vacían su interior y lo convierten en depósito de basura y sobrantes? ¿Y si la infancia se acostumbra a la muerte, a la violencia, a la inseguridad, a los barrotes y a los candados, a la contaminación, a la escasez? ¿Y si los pequeños de hoy ya no recuerdan, de pronto, que son la esencia que mora en su interior y no la superficialidad a la que le rinden culto? ¿Y si, por añadidura, despedazan y sepultan su creatividad, sus sentimientos, sus ideales, sus sueños, su inocencia sus anhelos y sus pensamientos? ¿Y si, cuando lo notemos, al despertar, al…

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Native American tribes reclaim California redwood land for preservation | Native Americans | The Guardian

The group of 10 tribes that have inhabited the area for thousands of years will be responsible for protecting the land dubbed Tc’ih-Léh-Dûñ, or “Fish Run Place” in the Sinkyone language.

Priscilla Hunter, the chair of the Sinkyone Council, said it is fitting they will be caretakers of the land where her people were removed or forced to flee before the forest was largely stripped for timber.

“It’s a real blessing,” said Hunter, of the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians. “It’s like a healing for our ancestors. I know our ancestors are happy. This was given to us to protect.”

The transfer marks a step in the growing Land Back movement to return Indigenous homelands to the descendants of those who lived there for millennia before European settlers arrived. In 2020, the Esselen tribe of northern California regained more than 1,000 acres of its ancestral homeland with a $4.5m deal involving the state and an Oregon conservation group. Such arrangements have become more common in recent years, allowing for the conservation of land and wildlife.

Source: Native American tribes reclaim California redwood land for preservation | Native Americans | The Guardian

Avian Flu Diary: FDA Removes Authorization For Two Monoclonal Antibody Therapies Due To Omicron

A few days earlier, in CDC HAN #00461: Using Therapeutics to Prevent and Treat COVID-19, we looked at a warning that two of the most frequently prescribed monoclonal antibody treatments (bamlanivimab and etesevimab and casirivimab and imdevimab) were no longer believed effective against Omicron.

While there is one remaining monoclonal antibody – sotrovimab – that is expected to be effective against Omicron, it is in very short supply, and its use must be strictly prioritized.

When these announcements were made, Delta was still producing about 25% of new infections in the United States, and so these two monoclonal antibody therapies remained available (see HAN note below).

Source: Avian Flu Diary: FDA Removes Authorization For Two Monoclonal Antibody Therapies Due To Omicron