21-31 December 1941

Brief excerpts for December 1941:”23 December, the American and Filipino units on Luzon, Philippines, began moving into the Bataan Peninsula. MacArthur was commanding from Corregidor and declared Manila an ‘open-city.’ The next day, 7,000 Japanese troops landed at Lamon Bay on the island and entrap the Allied soldiers on the peninsula.

24 December, after 2 weeks of steady bombardment and the landing of Japanese troops, Wake Island succumbed and US forces surrendered. / The vital British naval and air base at Rangoon, Burma received a major air bombardment.”

Pacific Paratrooper

Non-military objectives of the Philippines. (top) Pasay and (bottom) Cavite Non-military objectives of the Philippines. (top) Pasay and (bottom) Cavite

21-30 December, the 11th Indian Division retreated into southern Malaya and the Japanese were freed to push back the Australian troops.  The following link comes with a WARNING!  I located a video of Indian action in the war but there is Graphic Violence____HERE!

The big guns of Corregidor respond. The big guns of Corregidor respond.

23 December, the American and Filipino units on Luzon, Philippines, began moving into the Bataan Peninsula.  MacArthur was commanding from Corregidor and declared Manila an ‘open-city.’  The next day, 7,000 Japanese troops landed at Lamon Bay on the island and entrap the Allied soldiers on the peninsula.

24 December, after 2 weeks of steady bombardment and the landing of Japanese troops, Wake Island succumbed and US forces surrendered.  /  The vital British naval and air base at Rangoon, Burma received a major air bombardment.

24-31 December, along 400…

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9 thoughts on “21-31 December 1941”

  1. Thank you, Ned. The more we learn history, the more prepared we can be for the future. (unlike some who think hiding statues and rewriting school books can alter what already transpired.)

    1. Some statues should never have been put up to “honor” those who fought against the United States. Taking down such statues does not hide history – the history is covered in standard history texts. Text books that do not cover well the history of the United States, should be updated. My American History text books when I was in high school 1959-1962 stopped at 1956 and did not cover well any issues of foreign policy, internal or external war/conflicts. I am happy they have been updated.

    2. What government they believed was right, doesn’t alter the bravery they displayed. Today we know of soldiers who become friends with Japanese they fought against – if they can do it, why can’t we?

    3. I don’t know of any statues, parks, streets, libraries, court houses, or military bases in the US that honor Hirohito, Tojo, Rommel, Hitler, Mao, Eternal Leader Generalissimo Kim Il-sung, Bismark, Kaiser Wilhelm II or Stalin. We don’t honor those who ran or participated in the running of POW camps, concentration camps, extermination camps, POW death marches. That some former fighters from opposing sides sometimes became friendly or friends with each other, is fine but different, I believe.

    4. No none were, correct. My point is that we don’t honor those who fought against the United States of America with statues or naming parks, streets, buildings, etc. after them.

    5. I am sure. In Ohio, 50,000 troops were raised to defend the Union – USA – There was and is no need to honor those who fought to destroy the union and maintain slavery in Ohio. Taking down a statue or renaming a school does not erase General Lee; we should teach well about the issues and battles of the war to defend the Union – USA – and end slavery – but honor secessionists … nope. We did that and it allowed another 100 years of denying rights to Black-Americans 1865-1965. Desegregating schools, employment, housing, etc was the right thing to do from 1954 onward. Ensuring voting rights in 1965 was the right thing to do. Desegregating the military in 1948 was the right thing to do.

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