‘The Entire World Grovels to the Jews’: Belarus Dictator Alexander Lukashenko in Antisemitic Outburst | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com

Ninety percent of Belarus’s Jewish community — 800,000 people — were exterminated during the Holocaust. As in other countries in the region, including Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine and Latvia, the issue of local collaboration with the occupying Germans has been the subject of bitter debate in Belarus. One unit of the SS composed of Belarusian, Russian and Ukrainian collaborators was known as the 1st Belarusian Division, while thousands of Belarusians also served the internal security apparatus created by the Nazis following the 1941 invasion.

Yad Vashem, Israel’s national memorial to the Holocaust, has named 669 Belarusians as “Righteous Among the Nations” for risking their lives to protect Jews.

Lukashenko’s antisemitic outburst comes at a time when Belarus is facing increasing international scrutiny.

Source: ‘The Entire World Grovels to the Jews’: Belarus Dictator Alexander Lukashenko in Antisemitic Outburst | Jewish & Israel News Algemeiner.com

Chick Parsons – Our Man In Manila

Pacific Paratrooper

Charles ‘Chick’ Parsons

Charles Thomas Parsons Jr. was born in 1900 in Shelbyville, Tennessee, but his family moved frequently to avoid creditors. When young Charles was 5, his mother sent him to Manila for a more stable life with her brother, a public health official in the American-run government. The boy received his elementary education speaking Spanish at the Santa Potenciana School, a Catholic school founded in the 16th century. 

He returned to Tennessee as a teenager and graduated from Chattanooga High School. He sailed back to the Philippines as a merchant marine seaman in the early 1920s and shortly got himself hired as a stenographer for Maj. Gen. Leonard Wood, a hero of the Spanish-American War  On January 2, 1942, the Japanese Army marched into Manila unopposed.

Parsons retreated—only so far as his house on Dewey Boulevard, where he burned his uniforms and any other evidence that he was…

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Nutrients | Free Full-Text | Animal Protein versus Plant Protein in Supporting Lean Mass and Muscle Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Results from the meta-analyses demonstrated that protein source did not affect changes in absolute lean mass or muscle strength. Source: Nutrients | Free Full-Text | Animal Protein versus Plant Protein in Supporting Lean Mass and Muscle Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Miss Mexico 2021 organisers press ahead with pageant despite Covid surge among contestants | Mexico | The Guardian

At least 15 of the 32 contestants in the Miss Mexico 2021 pageant tested positive for coronavirus. A pageant staff member also tested positive, according to the Chihuahua state health secretariat.

“Even though many [of the contestants] were coughing, had body aches and even a temperature, they asked them not to complain,” a source from the pageant told the newspaper Reforma.

Prior to the pageant the contestants travelled to a school run in the scenic but impoverished Copper Canyon run by nuns for indigenous Tarahumara children, where they delivered school supplies and posed for selfies with the students. The source told Reforma that “a minimum 10 [contestants] had symptoms” on that trip.

Organizers in the northern city of Chihuahua proceeded with the pageant on 1 July – two days ahead of schedule. It is unknown why the date was changed and organizers have not commented.

Source: Miss Mexico 2021 organisers press ahead with pageant despite Covid surge among contestants | Mexico | The Guardian

B.C. heat wave ‘cooks’ fruit crops on the branch in sweltering Okanagan and Fraser Valley | CBC News

The heat wave that scorched Western Canada last week severely damaged fruit crops in the Okanagan and Fraser Valley as the province’s two major fruit-growing regions saw multiple days of temperatures above 40 C.

President of the B.C. Fruit Growers Association Pinder Dhaliwal estimates that 50 to 70 per cent of cherry crops were damaged in the heat wave. Dhaliwal said that apples, apricots and stone fruits have also been damaged to a lesser degree.

According to Dhaliwal, the heat wave “cooked” cherries right in the orchard, noting that they are brown in colour with burned leaves and dry stems.

“It seems like somebody took a blowtorch to it and just singed it,” says the orchardist from Oliver, in B.C.’s southern Interior.

Source: B.C. heat wave ‘cooks’ fruit crops on the branch in sweltering Okanagan and Fraser Valley | CBC News

Ortega Orders Night Raids, Arrests Student & Farm Leaders – Havana Times

This is the second time that peasant leader Medardo Mairena has been imprisoned by the dictatorship of Daniel Ortega and Rosario Murillo. On July 13, 2018, he was captured and later sentenced to 216 years in prison for fabricated crimes of terrorism. He was released on June 11, 2019, under an Amnesty Law promoted by the regime to allow impunity for its own crimes, which include 328 documented killings in 2018. After the arrest, AUN released a video that Jerez recorded in case he was arrested or disappeared. “If you are watching this video, it is because I am detained by the dictatorship, or I am incommunicado, thus adding to the list of political prisoners of the Ortega regime [now over 150]. This is the moment to continue the struggle, the dictatorship wants to end hope, we must continue together this fight for the freedom of the Nicaraguan people,” he said.

Source: Ortega Orders Night Raids, Arrests Student & Farm Leaders – Havana Times

Haitian Journalist Diego Charles Shot Dead – Havana Times

Haitian authorities should conduct a swift and comprehensive investigation into the killing of journalist Diego Charles, determine if he was targeted for his reporting, and ensure those responsible are brought to justice, the Committee to Protect Journalists said today.

At about 11:00 p.m. on June 29, unidentified men riding a motorcycle shot and killed Charles at the entrance of his home in the Christ-Roi area in Port-au-Prince, the capital, and fled the scene, according to news reports and Jacques Desrosiers, secretary-general of the Association of Haitian Journalists, a local trade group, who spoke to CPJ via messaging app.

The attackers also shot and killed political activist Marie Antoinette Duclair, who was inside a nearby car after driving Charles home following a meeting that both attended, according to those sources.

Charles worked as a reporter for the privately owned radio and television outlet Radio Vision 2000, the news website Gazette Haïti, and co-founded the news website Larepiblik Magazine, according to those sources and Valéry Numa, an anchor at Radio Vision 2000, who spoke with CPJ over messaging app.

Source: Haitian Journalist Diego Charles Shot Dead – Havana Times

How identifying hotspots of zoonotic disease could prevent another pandemic | Science| In-depth reporting on science and technology | DW | 06.07.2021

Regulating hygiene, or veterinary requirements for the trade and consumption of wild animals, might be a more effective strategy. This would also provide insight into the potential sources of danger.

Risk grids to identify hotspots

The World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF) has worked with scientists from Hong Kong to develop a tool to assess wildlife markets for future risks of zoonotic outbreaks. The risk matrix, published in the One Health scientific journal, will initially be used to analyze wildlife markets in the Asia-Pacific region. The sales situation in the respective market and the animal species or the number of wild animals traded are taken into account.

The team surveyed 46 wildlife markets in Laos and Myanmar. They showed a high zoonotic risk on about half of the days when the researchers made their observations.

It is clear that there are wildlife markets that always seem to have a high risk of zoonosis, said Stefan Ziegler, Senior Conservation Advisor Asia for the WWF and one of the authors of the study.

Source: How identifying hotspots of zoonotic disease could prevent another pandemic | Science| In-depth reporting on science and technology | DW | 06.07.2021

Why we Need to Build Economies– not Walls– to Stop Migration | Inter Press Service

The faces you see of those arriving, in what could be the highest influx to the United States in 15 years, represent the reality in rural El Salvador, where so many people escaping poverty find only a dead-end.

Years of reliance on imported food has held back the development of the country’s agricultural sector, on which so many rural families rely. This has created a vicious cycle that suppresses the domestic market, limits job creation and forces rural workers to look to cities and other countries, particularly rural youth, who are reluctant to work in agriculture because they see limited returns.

For my family, producing on the land has been a way of life for generations, and I am familiar with the challenges that farmers face.

I also know that Salvadoran farmers need not face a binary choice of stay and struggle, or risk everything by moving elsewhere. Instead of carrying a bag of belongings to the border, harvesting a sack of vegetables can represent the way not only out of poverty, but into a position of security and even prosperity, and I have seen how this can work.

Source: Why we Need to Build Economies– not Walls– to Stop Migration | Inter Press Service