Measuring the impact of COVID-19 vaccine misinformation on vaccination intent in the UK and USA | Nature Human Behaviour

Interestingly, more respondents in both countries would accept a vaccine if it meant protecting family, friends or at-risk groups (than if the vaccine was for themselves): 63.7% (95% PI 62.2 to 65.1) of respondents in the UK and 54.1% (95% PI 52.5 to 55.7) in the USA say that they would ‘definitely’ get vaccinated to protect others (Table 1). The exposure to misinformation again induces a decrease in intent to accept the vaccine to protect others, by 5.7 percentage points (95% PI 3.5 to 7.9) in the UK and 6.5 percentage points (95% PI 4.1 to 8.8) in the USA (Table 1) for the treatment group relative to the control. The treatment effects when conditioned on pre-treatment vaccination intent show a similar picture. For instance, in the USA there is a net decrease in those who previously responded ‘definitely’ by 8.7 percentage points (95% PI 5.3 to 12.1) and a net increase in those who previously responded ‘no, definitely no’ by 10.0 percentage points (95% PI 2.1 to 18.7). The same substantive results hold for the UK. Source: Measuring the impact of COVID-19 vaccine misinformation on vaccination intent in the UK and USA | Nature Human Behaviour