MY TAKE: How Russia is leveraging insecure mobile apps to radicalize disaffected males | The Last Watchdog – (iFunny a Russian front)

In the weeks leading up to the 2020 U.S. presidential election, investigators at Pixalate, a Palo Alto, Calif.-based supplier of fraud management technology, documented how iFunny distributed data-stealing malware and, in doing so, actually targeted smartphone users in the key swing states of Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin. The public is unlikely to ever learn who ordered this campaign, and what they did — or intend to do, going forward — with this particular trove of stolen data.

Advertising practices

Even so, this shared intelligence from Pixalate is instructive. It vividly illustrates how threat actors have gravitated to hacking vulnerable mobile apps. The state of mobile app security is poor. Insecure mobile apps represent a huge and growing attack vector. Mobile apps are being pushed out of development more rapidly than ever, with best security practices often a fleeting afterthought. Apps with gaping security holes are on the phones and at the fingertips of every person glued to his or her smartphone. These security weaknesses happen to align seamlessly with the spreading of disinformation.

Source: MY TAKE: How Russia is leveraging insecure mobile apps to radicalize disaffected males | The Last Watchdog