What George Takei learned about resilience in Japanese internment camp

 

George Takei's family in the Wilshire district of Los Angeles, photo taken around 1940. From left to right: George’s baby sister Nancy is held by George’s, mother Fumiko Emily Takei. To their left is George’s father, Takekuma Norman Takei. George’s brother Henry is in the middle and all the way on the right right is George.

George Takei’s family in the Wilshire district of Los Angeles, photo taken around 1940. From left to right: George’s baby sister Nancy is held by George’s, mother Fumiko Emily Takei. To their left is George’s father, Takekuma Norman Takei. George’s brother Henry is in the middle and all the way on the right right is George.
Photo courtesy George Takei

“My father said resilience isn’t all just teeth gritting, strength and endurance — it’s also the ability to find beauty in an ugly situation or an ugly place, to make your joy,” Takei tells CNBC Make It.

“My father said … we think of resilience as flexing the veins on our throat and [saying], ’I’m going to survive — fortitude,” Takei says. And “that is part of resilience, but … you’re going to be exhausted when it’s flexing all the time.”

So you have to “look around and see beauty” too, Takei says his father taught him.

Source: What George Takei learned about resilience in Japanese internment camp