‘Fishwrap’ fake news campaign recycles old news of terror attacks | Media | The Guardian “2020 election prep” to support Trump?

“There are two candidates here,” Truvé said. “It’s either a state-sponsored misinformation campaign, or it’s a domestic alt-right thing, because it is focused on terror events to do with Muslims. Or it could be what we call ‘operational preparedness’ – they’re up, active, creating history for themselves and their accounts, and then they want to use it in the future to spread original fake news.” But without specific information about the users that only the social networks have access to, Recorded Future cannot be more definite in its attribution. “Whichever way this is set up – they’re not breaking any laws, they’re not breaking even the terms of use of Twitter,” Truvé said. Misinformation campaigns, also known as “influence operations”, frequently use a combination of technical and societal factors in an attempt to spread propaganda. For instance, a computer vulnerability may be exploited to register hundreds or thousands of fake accounts, which are then deployed to influence curation algorithms and boost a particular news story or topic.

Source: ‘Fishwrap’ fake news campaign recycles old news of terror attacks | Media | The Guardian