Indulging Steve Bannon is just a form of liberal narcissism | Nesrine Malik

White supremacy and fascist flirtations are not ideas that need to be ‘exposed’. We just need to fight them. White supremacy and fascist flirtations are not ideas that need to be ‘exposed’. We just need to fight them. White supremacy and fascist flirtations are not ideas that need to be ‘exposed’. We just need to fight them.

4391.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=forma

White supremacy and fascist flirtations are not ideas that need to be ‘exposed’. We just need to fight them

I grew up in the long shadow of a military coup. To be a child in a country where relatives and friends suddenly disappeared, were detained indefinitely without trial, or in some instances executed, was to grow up very quickly. But the most difficult thing to process was seeing those who had lost family to the government’s brutality scramble to make peace with its members, or even join it, once it became clear the military regime was staying. It’s still a depressing thing to return to Sudan and see men who I remember as a child returning from prison gaunt and hollowed out with starvation and torture, sit among the government’s ranks, fatted, safe, and soft with power.

But it taught me an important lesson: the fate some politicians fear most is not defeat, it is irrelevance. And as the Donald Trump administration functions largely like an African dictatorship, it has been a lesson that has been helpful in shedding light on the complicity of formerly moral Republicans, and in turn, the normalisation of Trump and his associates by liberals.

Continue reading…