Making a military widow cry: that is a classic Trump move | Richard Wolffe | Opinion | The Guardian

Like all bad habits, it follows a pattern. Trump was remarkably silent about the deaths in Niger, even though he and his fellow Republicans couldn’t stop talking about the US lives lost in the ambush in Benghazi in 2012. When he came under fire for not calling the relatives of the fallen soldiers, Trump said he had written letters which had not yet been mailed. The US Postal Service is obviously not what it used to be.When that bumbling excuse fell flat, he claimed Obama failed to call gold star families, including his own chief of staff, John Kelly, whose son died in Afghanistan. This claim has been forcefully rejected by Obama’s aides, while Kelly’s associates can recall no such thing.This kind of behavior might be normal among middle school students whose hormones interfere with their ability to finish their homework on time. Explaining Trump’s actions is altogether more unsettling.You can’t say there were no warning signs of this kind of weirdness. Trump lashed out at the gold star family of Humayun Khan who died in Iraq in 2004, when they attacked his Muslim travel ban. Naturally Trump went after Khan’s mother for no good reason, claiming she was forbidden from talking.Launching a personal attack on an emotionally vulnerable citizen without any foundation in fact: the signature Trump move.Then again, he recently mocked the Spanish accent of the long-suffering US citizens in Puerto Rico, threw paper towels into a San Juan crowd like he was shooting hoops, and threatened to pull out his own government support from the US territory.

Source: Making a military widow cry: that is a classic Trump move | Richard Wolffe | Opinion | The Guardian