Nevada Death-Row Prisoner Released on Plea Deal After Medical Evidence Suggests No Crime Occurred | Death Penalty Information Center

Ha’im Al Matin Sharif, formerly known as Charles Robins, has been released from Nevada’s death row, nearly 30 years after he was convicted of killing his girlfriend’s 11-month-old daughter, after medical evidence revealed that the baby died from infantile scurvy, rather than from physical abuse. Prosecutors agreed to amend the charges against Sharif and release him on time served after a prosecution doctor confirmed that Brittany Smith actually died of Barlow’s disease, a form of scurvy affecting infants. The child’s autopsy showed broken bones and hemorrhages, a local medical examiner listed the cause of death as blunt force trauma, and Las Vegas police accused Sharif of torturing her. “I was confused as to the nature of the injuries they described, because I had done nothing,” Sharif said. The child’s mother initially told police that Sharif was not abusive, but then testified against him. She later recanted her testimony and told Sharif’s appellate attorney that police had coerced her into providing false testimony implicating Sharif by threatening to take her other children away. During Sharif’s appeals, medical experts who reviewed the baby’s X-rays to rule out disease as the cause of death said the injuries were likely caused by scurvy.

Source: Nevada Death-Row Prisoner Released on Plea Deal After Medical Evidence Suggests No Crime Occurred | Death Penalty Information Center

Hurricane Season Is Here, and Trump Doesn’t Care | Dame Magazine

Our local and state governments owe it to the American people to help with storm preparation and cleanup, and to do that we need organizations that are up and running. Should this happen again, I know I cannot count on the actions of President Trump; I know I cannot count on the wisdom of Gov. Scott. I will have to find my own way through the storm.

Source: Hurricane Season Is Here, and Trump Doesn’t Care | Dame Magazine

A survivor of the Nagasaki bombing in 1945

A smiling face in such dismal surroundings, no one yet truly understood what had been done.The miracle survivors of the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombings have become known as the Hibakusha, meaning “explosion affected people” in Japanese. One survivor who was a little girl at the time, explained her experience, “I saw a bright blast, and I saw yellow and silver and orange and all sorts of colors that I can’t explain. Those colors came and attacked us, and the ceiling beams of the wooden school along with the glass from the window pane all shattered and blew away all at once.”

Source: vintage everyday: A survivor of the Nagasaki bombing in 1945

London pride: hope after despair – sister-hood magazine. A Fuuse production by Deeyah Khan.

In case if any of you were wondering if I’m writing an angry piece, I would like to stress that you are absolutely right. This is an angry piece by a very angry black woman. I’m owning this and I’m not apologising for it either.FGM is a form of sexual assault against the girl child. It must be treated as such. Grabbing a child or even a baby who is just few days old, spreading her legs apart and touching her genitals is multiply violating even before the cutting begins. When the physical mutilation takes place, a deep rooted emotional wound is also created. When I talk about FGM I always refer to the child. I feel that that there’s a lack acknowledgment of the harm caused on a child by FGM which leads to a lack of support for those affected by such physical and emotional violence. There seems to be more focus on negotiating with ‘practicing communities.’In dialogues about any form of harm we need to think about who makes up the practicing community. The answer is very simple: globally we are all from communities where women and girls suffer gender-based violence, including FGM. Explain how FGM on black girls is barbaric but the blonde, blue-eyed girl who has designer vagina surgery in Harley street is an acceptable part of modern life.

Source: London pride: hope after despair – sister-hood magazine. A Fuuse production by Deeyah Khan.