Native American and indigenous rights: “There is no word for wall in our language” | In English | EL PAÍS

The Tohono O’odham – the name means desert people – have lived on both sides of the border since their lands were arbitrarily divided between the United States and Mexico some 160 years ago. Around 30,000 members of the nation live in Arizona. Meanwhile, several thousand more – and the majority of the nation’s sacred sites – can be found in Mexico.Trump’s wall would be a coup de grace for a nation whose territory doesn’t respect international borders and the Tohono O’odham have taken the fight to protect their lands to the Washington-based Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

“If they build the wall, it will be over my dead body,” says Verlon José, Vice President of the Tohono O’odham nation.

Source: Native American and indigenous rights: “There is no word for wall in our language” | In English | EL PAÍS