The World’s Oldest and Oddest Vending Machines You Never Knew Existed

Vending machines have come a long way from selling simply cans of Coke, chocolate bars and packets of crisps. Almost anything imaginable can now be purchased from the dispensaries, there is little that can’t be found in the self-service devices. Here’s a collection of vintage photographs, which date from the 1920s to the late 1960s, showcases some of the world’s oldest and oddest vending machines.

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A woman in London is able to continue her grocery shop thanks to a vending machine which says it dispenses fruit but seems to offer kitchen cupboard essentials such as Oxo cubes, tins of food, matches and Colgate products, 1920.

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A woman buys fruit from a coin operated machine at Paddington Station in London, ca. 1920s.

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A woman uses The Maiwarm Company soda machine in 1928. It was the first of its kind not to require a soda squirter.

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Mid adult couple purchasing ice cream from a vending machine, ca. 1930s.

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A man uses the cafeteria vending machine called ‘Automat’, ca. 1940s.

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Tracey Ullman: ‘My face is good for impersonations’

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One of America’s most successful comic actors is back in Britain. Tracey Ullman tells Nigel Farndale why

At Tracey Ullman’s suggestion, we meet at a private member’s club around the corner from her home in Mayfair. In some ways this salubrious venue seems an appropriate setting, because according to the Sunday Times Rich List, the 55-year-old comic actor is worth £75m.

But in other ways it does not. The club is one of those places where you find yourself talking in muted voices so as not to disturb other members, and this doesn’t suit the voluble personality I’ve encountered in YouTube clips of Ullman on chat shows down the years. In those she’s very full on, an extrovert who seems more American than British, not least because she became a US citizen in 2006, after 20 years of living there.

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The white man pathology | US news | The Guardian

Sanders’s exasperation was the principal fact to be communicated, more than any political content. Trump was about winning again. Sanders was about having lost. The vagueness of American politics is what astonished the outsider. It’s all about feelings and God and bullshit. Sanders actually uttered the following sentence out loud: “What we’re saying is when millions of people come together to restore their government we can do extraordinary things.” Nobody asked what he meant. Nobody asked for numbers. They applauded. Better to take it in the spirit in which it’s given, like a Catskills resort comedian.Sanders reminded me of a line from Seinfeld, maybe because Larry David’s SNL parody was only a few days’ old. “The sea was angry that day, my friends, like an old man trying to send back soup at a deli.” When Ben and Jerry make a Bernie Sanders ice cream, I hope it’s chili and ginger: the delicious hot flavour of nasal-passage clearing outrage.

Source: The white man pathology | US news | The Guardian