Why the Economics of “Me” Can’t Replace the Economics of “We” (Link)

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Much of our political and economic fervor is a competition between Left vs. Right, and unfettered capitalism vs. governmental regulation. We must remember The Commons that belong to all of society.

Why the Economics of “Me” Can’t Replace the Economics of “We” (Link)

For more than two hundred years, mainstream thinking has regarded the market as the primary source of material “progress.” And indeed, to a large extent that’s been true. But yesterday is not forever. Today the market is approaching a point of diminishing returns – systemic diminishing returns. It is yielding less well-being per unit of output by practically any measure, and more problems instead: obesity instead of good health, congestion instead of mobility , time deficits instead of leisure, depression and stress instead of a sense of well-being, social fracture rather than cohesion, environmental degradation rather than improvement.

In place of wealth, the economic machinery increasingly turns…

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Yanis Varoufakis, Edmund Burke and Mario Draghi stroll into a bar

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good people do nothing.” Edmund Burke’s brilliant line applies to today’s Europe perfectly.Here, on this site and across Europe, ‘something’ is brewing, ‘something’ is under construction…

Source: Yanis Varoufakis, Edmund Burke and Mario Draghi stroll into a bar

Economists to Cameron: refugee crisis response ‘morally unacceptable’

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In open letter to PM, more than 120 leading economists including former UN and World Bank officials say UK can do far more

More than 120 leading economists, among them former government, UN and World Bank officials, have lambasted the UK government’s response to the refugee crisis, calling it seriously inadequate, morally unacceptable and economically wrong.

In an open letter to David Cameron, the economists argue that as the world’s fifth-largest economy, the UK “can do far more” and are calling on the government to take a “fair and proportionate share of refugees, both those already within the EU and those still outside it”.

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