Dawn and the Sea #poetry

Baja, I miss you madly and this poem – grin – makes me miss you all the more – miss the sea at dawn, noon, 4 pm and midnight – grin

penned in moon dust

tidal foam

my eyes long to caress you smooth as silk

your bronze glow accentuated by dawn

my fingers can only momentary trace a message

watery “I love yous” fade away

as the sea draws lacy covers back

remnant of a long night blurrs

gold red rays warm your skin

 long legged birds celebrate your awakening

I a mere voyeur watch…

the morning rises from slumber

 meeting the sea’s welcome embrace

I inhale the beauty of a new day

sandpiper dawn

This week’s prompt at Poet’s United Midweek Motif is Beauty. Where in the world do you see beauty?

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Found in the Forest #poetry #photography

The forest is alive and this brings it to new life

penned in moon dust

forest path

I stop… mesmerized

sunshine reaches down

they’re holding hands

radiance from the ground

I stand… reaching

with my eyes

I soak in warmth

kneel where nature lies

I breathe…silence

listen to holy teaching

never quite the same

for truth I’m always seeking

forest leaf

Sharing with the poets at Poet’s United – Sunday’s Poetry Pantry always has room for more poets to share their work.

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Mexican chemical engineering student creates a way to clean clothes without water or detergent

Latina Lista: News from the Latino perspective Latina Lista: News from the Latino perspective – News from the Latino perspective. Mexican chemical engineering student creates a way to clean clothes without water or detergent by Latina Lista

LatinaLista — With the drought hitting cities, states and countries around the world, people are waking up to how essential water is for daily existence, far beyond just for drinking. For example, what would people do about washing their dirty clothes if there was no water?

A young Mexican chemical engineering student believes she has the answer.

Jessica Cruz Aguirre
Jessica Cruz Aguirre
, a student at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) (National Autonomous University of Mexico), discovered one way that clothes can be cleaned without water or detergent — but by using bacteria.

The bacterias used are mostly associated with metals but Aguirre has fine-tuned the “eating” properties of the bacteria to create a cleaning agent for clothes. Aguirre trained the bacteria to eat the organic materials associated with wine stains. Without genetically modifying the bacteria, Aguirre allowed the bacteria to learn to recognize wine as a food source. Over time, the bacteria naturally modified itself to see wine as food. Once it accomplished that, Aguirre mixed wine with cooking oil and sweat so that the bacteria can see those mixtures as dirt and eat them too.

Aguirre and her project partner, Paulina Mar Lucas, envision their creation as a single container that has two sprays. One spray releases the bacteria onto the dirty garment where on contact the bacteria eats organic particles, removes odor and stains. A second misting kills these organisms and adds softening and perfumes to the clothes so they feel soft and smell pleasant.

Aguirre’s project won her the National Award and brought her second place in the Latin America Henkel Innovation Challenge. Yet, while such an idea has most of the world anxious for its completion, Aguirre concedes further testing needs to be done to make sure the release of the bacteria doesn’t pose a health or environmental hazard.

For now, Aguirre is leaving the further development and testing of her idea to the Mexican business Sinaqua, which will finance future testing, securing the patent and commercialization of the product over the next few years.

Aguirre is scheduled to receive her degree by February and March of next year and already has plans to open up her own business. “I like biotechnology,” Aguirre told an interviewer from her university. “But I’m not closed to other options. I try to think of innovative ideas and build something. After a year or two, I’ll pursue my Master’s but for now, I don’t know what I want to specialize (my studies) in and want to wait until I’m sure of what I want to do.”

Mexican chemical engineering student creates a way to clean clothes without water or detergent | Latina Lista

Jessica Cruz Aguirre[/caption], a student at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) (National Autonomous University of Mexico), discovered one way that clothes can be cleaned without water or detergent — but by using bacteria.The bacterias used are mostly associated with metals but Aguirre has fine-tuned the “eating” properties of the bacteria to create a cleaning agent for clothes. Aguirre trained the bacteria to eat the organic materials associated with wine stains. Without genetically modifying the bacteria, Aguirre allowed the bacteria to learn to recognize wine as a food source. Over time, the bacteria naturally modified itself to see wine as food. Once it accomplished that, Aguirre mixed wine with cooking oil and sweat so that the bacteria can see those mixtures as dirt and eat them too.Aguirre and her project partner, Paulina Mar Lucas, envision their creation as a single container that has two sprays. One spray releases the bacteria onto the dirty garment where on contact the bacteria eats organic particles, removes odor and stains. A second misting kills these organisms and adds softening and perfumes to the clothes so they feel soft and smell pleasant.

Source: Mexican chemical engineering student creates a way to clean clothes without water or detergent | Latina Lista

Uproar in St. Petersburg after demon statue destroyed | News | DW.COM | 30.08.2015

Famed for its cultural heritage, St. Petersburg is often called the “northern Palmyra” because of its rich architectural treasures. After the destruction of the bas relief some drew parallels between the Russian vandals and Islamic State militants who have blown up temples in the ancient Syrian oasis city of Palmyra.Earlier this month fundamentalist Orthodox activists attacked exhibits at a show of sculptures in Moscow, saying they offended believers. More than $15,000 (13,420 euros) worth of damage was reportedly done to Soviet-era linocuts in the incident.

Source: Uproar in St. Petersburg after demon statue destroyed | News | DW.COM | 30.08.2015

 

fundamentalists at work