Government boosts GDP by adding sex and drugs to economy

Pride's Purge

(not satire – no really, it’s not!)

The government’s thought of a sure-fire way to boost the economy.

The Office for National Statistics has decided to include prostitution and sales of heroin in its assessments of the UK economy – adding 5 per cent to the UK’s gross domestic product at a stroke;

Drugs and prostitution add £10bn to UK economy

Now we know why George Osborne was chosen to run the economy.

He might only have worked as a towel folder in Selfridges before becoming chancellor but he’s a real expert on prostitutes and illegal drugs.

Allegedly.

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Please feel free to comment.

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An open letter to all my male friends | Estelle Tang | Comment is free | theguardian.com

To all my male friends,

I want to tell you about something that happened to me today.

I was walking to the gym when a guy on a bike rode past and said, “baby, can I smack that ass?” I am used to this kind of behaviour in my New York City neighbourhood, so I usually ignore it. Trust me – if I had it out with every man who said things like this to me, I’d have a much shorter, much more annoying day. So I just kept walking. He said it again, but before I could even decide what to do (or if I should do anything) about it, I felt his hand on my butt.

via An open letter to all my male friends | Estelle Tang | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Miss Calypso: Maya Angelou’s Life in Music

Repeating Islands

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This short piece by Dee Lockett appeared in Slate.

“Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness,” the revered poet and activist, Maya Angelou, who died Wednesday at age 86, once described her relationship with songwriting. As the former U.S. Poet Laureate and the author of a classic memoir, she’ll likely be remembered most for her writing, but Angelou’s talents extended well beyond the written and spoken word. In fact, in the early 1950s—a decade before her first published writing—Angelou started out as an aspiring dancer and singer who slowly gained a following from her performances in local San Francisco nightclubs.

And in 1957, at the height of the calypso movement—a style popularized by Harry Belafonte—Angelou recorded her first and only album, Miss Calypso. In it, she covers Nat King Cole’s “Calypso Blues” and Louis Jordan’s “Run Joe,”…

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