Pokagon Potawatomi Seeking to Have Squaw Creek Renamed to Nokmes Creek | Native News Online

The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, based in Dowagiac, Michigan, is seeking to have a name of a creek changed from Squaw Creek to Nokmes Creek.

The word Nokmes, which means “grandmother,” honors American Indian women, unlike the term “squaw.” Many American Indians consider the term extremely derogatory.

via Pokagon Potawatomi Seeking to Have Squaw Creek Renamed to Nokmes Creek | Native News Online.

Agricultura Urbana y Periurbana como herramienta para la seguridad alimentaria y el desarrollo municipal (copy 1)

Agricultura Urbana y Periurbana como herramienta para la seguridad alimentaria y el desarrollo municipal

El curso aporta toda la experiencia acumulada en la FAO para la formación de capacidades al interior de las instituciones públicas para la formulación y ejecución de programas integrales de agricultura urbana y periurbana y seguridad alimentaria y nutricional en los municipios de la región.

Los contenidos fueron diseñados y editados por el Grupo de Agricultura Urbana y Periurbana (GAUP) de la Oficina Regional de la FAO para América Latina y el Caribe, IPES Promoción del Desarrollo Sostenible y la Fundación RUAF.

via Agricultura Urbana y Periurbana como herramienta para la seguridad alimentaria y el desarrollo municipal (copy 1).

H5N1: China: Do dogs transmit H1N1 to humans?

During 2012, we identified dogs sampled with elevated antibodies (≥1:40) against A(H1N1)pdm09 virus: HI assay (24.7%) and MN assay (10.8%). This high seroprevalence of A(H1N1)pdm09 among dogs without clinical signs of influenza support the premise that dogs may play a role in human influenza ecology in China.

via H5N1: China: Do dogs transmit H1N1 to humans?.

However! Seems to be a very human-centric view of things. We look for animals, insects, bacteria, and viruses that transmit disease to humans but not for diseases that humans pass to animals, etc. Dogs and cats especially, are as likely to become ill from human ills, as is the opposite since we live in such intimate environment with them. The same can be said for horses, camels, sheep, goats, cattle, and pigs, and people.

H5N1: Antibiotics as “fat drugs”

If you walk into a farm-supply store today, you’re likely to find a bag of antibiotic powder that claims to boost the growth of poultry and livestock. That’s because decades of agricultural research has shown that antibiotics seem to flip a switch in young animals’ bodies, helping them pack on pounds. Manufacturers brag about the miraculous effects of feeding antibiotics to chicks and nursing calves. Dusty agricultural journals attest to the ways in which the drugs can act like a kind of superfood to produce cheap meat.

But what if that meat is us? Recently, a group of medical investigators have begun to wonder whether antibiotics might cause the same growth promotion in humans. New evidence shows that America’s obesity epidemic may be connected to our high consumption of these drugs. But before we get to those findings, it’s helpful to start at the beginning, in 1948, when the wonder drugs were new — and big was beautiful.

via H5N1: Antibiotics as “fat drugs”.