The global struggle for peasants seeds: A struggle for our future | Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy

After all, according to ETC Group, 80-90% of seeds are sourced outside of commercial markets, that is to say through peasant seed systems, and farm-saved seeds. In the new publication, Our Seeds Our Future La Via Campesina chronicles ten experiences of peasant seed selection, saving, improvement, and re-use. These experiences in recovering and reproducing knowledge to improve peasant agricultural food production are mirrored by multitudes more in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas.

via The global struggle for peasants seeds: A struggle for our future | Food First/Institute for Food and Development Policy.

Obama defends Iran deal, rejects ‘tough talk, bluster’ | News , Middle East | THE DAILY STAR

\”Huge challenges remain, but we cannot close the door on diplomacy, and we cannot rule out peaceful solutions to the world\’s problems,\” Obama said following the landmark agreement reached in Geneva over the weekend concerning Iran\’s nuclear program.

\”We cannot commit ourselves to an endless cycle of violence, and tough talk and bluster may be the easy thing to do politically, but it\’s not the right thing for our security.\”

via Obama defends Iran deal, rejects ‘tough talk, bluster’ | News , Middle East | THE DAILY STAR.

Big pharma’s latest secret: the morning after pill may not work if you weigh over 165 pounds

The morning after pill may be less effective on women who weigh 165 pounds or more; it may be totally ineffective on women who weigh 176 pounds or more; in Europe, the morning after pill is not recommended for women who weigh 165 pounds or more. So why doesn’t the average American woman know that her emergency contraception might not work?

HRA Pharma, the French manufacturer of the European drug, Norlevo, is changing its packaging, big time. It will now warn users that the drug is ineffective in women weighing over 176 pounds and less effective in women who weigh more than 165 pounds. It will even recommend that women who weigh 165 pounds not take the pill. But why does that matter to women in the U.S. of A? Because, as Molly Redden points out in Mother Jones,  Norvelo, is chemically identical to Plan B One-Step, Next Choice One Dose, My Way, and several generic emergency contraceptives. Given that the average American woman weighs 166.2 pounds, this is especially significant: “There’s a whole swath of American women for whom (these pills) are not effective,” explains James Trussell, a professor of public affairs at Princeton University and a senior fellow with the Guttmacher Institute. But unlike their sisters overseas, American women won’t be getting any warnings about this risk.

In Europe, it works and worked like this: in 2011 a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Edinborough published research showing that emergency contraceptive pills were less effective on women who weighed more. In 2012, HRA Pharma started reviewing this data and got permission from the European Union to update its warning. In 2014, every single box of Norlevo will say ”Studies suggest that Norlevo is less effective in women weighing [165 pounds] or more and not effective in women weighing [176 pounds] or more” and that Norlevo “is not recommended…if you weigh [165 pounds] or more.”

In the U.S., however, as Redden explains,

the Food and Drug Administration prohibits generic drug manufacturers from changing product information unless the brand name manufacturer makes a change, companies that manufacture generic versions of Plan B One-Step cannot update their packaging information unless Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, the exclusive manufacturer of Plan B One-Step, acts first.

via Big pharma’s latest secret: the morning after pill may not work if you weigh over 165 pounds.

The single killer question from ATOS that drove a woman to suicide

The old flick Brazil ought to be required viewing for people who work for ATOS!

Pride's Purge

(not satire – it’s ATOS)

I might have to stop writing satire. It seems I might be giving the wrong people some very bad ideas.

Back in January I wrote a satirical blogpost about ATOS reducing their fit-for-work tests to one question:

ATOS to reduce ‘fit for work’ test to one question: “Are you alive?”

Now it looks like ATOS have decided my blogpost was a good idea.

A partially-blind and disabled woman had her benefits stopped after she attended an interview with ATOS in which she was asked just one question.

And as a result of her one word answer to the question, the woman killed herself:

Bristol woman “killed herself after benefits were stopped”

What was the single question by ATOS’s so-called ‘expert’ which trumped a lifetime of professional doctor’s opinions and supporting medical evidence?

Did you come here by bus?

A killer question indeed.

.

Someone…

View original post 30 more words

Syria polio outbreak reaches 13 cases among children | Vaccine News Daily

Both the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the World Health Organization assessed there is a considerable risk that polio could spread to other countries in the region. There is also a risk of infection in European countries that received Syrian refugees.

via Syria polio outbreak reaches 13 cases among children | Vaccine News Daily.